Nā Ponohula

Nā Ponohula workshops are active and hands-on.  They are designed for adults, minimum 18 years of age.  Nā Ponohula workshops are available for Ka ʻAha Hula ʻO Hālauaola registrants only. There are special requirements for participants in the Kāʻekeʻeke and ʻOhe Hano Ihu and Lauhala Preparation Workshops which will include two nights residency in Waipiʻo Valley. Some sites may not be wheelchair accessible.  Class size is limited to 20 participants.  All Nā Ponohula participants are expected to participate in the Hōʻike on September 23, 2018, Saturday.


ʻIPU HEKE

Kumu Hula Lehua Kauʻulukukui
The ʻIpu Heke is a double gourd implement used in Hula. Participants will learn about the importance and meaning of the ʻIpu Heke and will make and learn to play their implement. Nā Ponohula participants will learn a hula or oli for the Ipu Heke.
*Moderate activity


KĀʻEKEʻEKE & ʻOHE HANO IHU

Kumu Kealiʻi Lilly
Participants will gather bamboo, measure, cut, clean, sand and learn how to play the Kāʻekeʻeke and ʻOhe Hano Ihu or nose flute.  This workshop will take place in Waipiʻo Valley where participants are required to reside for two nights. Participants must bring their own sleeping bags, towels and personal supplies for indoor/outdoor camping.  Participants must be able to walk down to the site from the Waipiʻo Lookout. This workshop will work closely with the Lauhala Preparation & Weaving activity.  Nā Ponohula participants will learn to perform a mele.
*Strenuous activity – This site is not wheelchair accessible


KAPA & HAWAIIAN DYES

Kumu Johnny Mae Makuakane
Kapa is a traditional Hawaiian cloth made from the wauke or paper mulberry plant. It was used for clothing and as soft mats for sleeping This workshop will introduce participants to the art of kapa making.  Each person will have an opportunity to make a small kapa and dye using native plants. Nā Ponohula participants will learn to perform an oli to honor the kapa tradition.
*Moderate activity


HULA KIʻI BEAMER TRADITIONS

Kumu Mauliola Cook
The term Hula Kiʻi covers a wide variety of dramatic techniques, ranging from dancers portraying images (kiʻi) of gods, to puppets being manipulated as if they were dancing. The style of hula ki`i preserved in the Beamer family uses small hand puppets which are brought to life in movements influenced by the dancer. Join Mauliola Cook, as she shares this beloved tradition shared with her by her kumu and mentor, Aunty Nona Beamer. Nā Ponohula participants will learn to perform an oli or hula to accompany their Hula Kiʻi.
*Moderate Activity


HULA KIʻI TRADITIONS OF PUN

Kumu Hula Auliʻi Mitchell
Learn the art of Hula Kiʻi learned from the hula ancestry of Kumu Hula Auliʻi Mitchell.  Participants will learn to make their Hula Kiʻi using techniques and styles in the tradition of the Mitchell ʻOhana.  Nā Ponohula participants will learn an oli or hula to accompany their Hula Kiʻi.
*Moderate activity


KAULA & KNOTS

Kumu ʻUmi Kai
The art form of making cordage was a very valuable and essential life skill. Cordage is used for girding a paʻū and can be used for numerous other ties and ornamental designs. Haumana will learn to identify, gather, strip and prepare fibers of the native Hau plant. They will also learn to haku or braid 3,4,5, 6,7 and 8 cords for different effects and usage.
*Moderate activity


LAPAIKI

Kumu Hula Kapuaokalaniikapoliopele Kaaua
Participants will make a small pahu or hula drum. This is an intensive workshop on how to finish the drum, lash the skin of the drumhead to the lapaiki. Nā Ponohula participants will learn to perform an oli using the lapaiki.
*Moderate to Strenuous activity


LAUHALA PREPARATION & WEAVING

Kumu Hula Lolay Muraki
Participants will gather, clean, strip and prepare lauhala and weave a pale for their ipu. This workshop will take place in Waipiʻo Valley where partiipants are required to reside for two nights. Participants must bring their own sleeping bags towels and personal supplies for indoor/outdoor camping.  Participants must be able to walk down to the site from the Waipiʻo Lookout. This workshop will work closely with the Kāʻekeʻeke & ʻOhe Hano Ihu activity.  Nā Ponohula participants will learn to perform a mele.
*Strenuous activity    This site is not wheelchair accessible


NĀ LEI HULA

Kumu Kenneth Victor
Learn to make different styles of lei using native flora.  Participants will learn proper protocol for  picking plants for their lei. This huakaʻi may include a visit to various sites to gather plants Nā Ponohula participants will also learn an oli or hula to accompany the making of lei.
*Moderate activity


PŪNIU

Kumu tba
The Pūniu is a small drum usually tied to the thigh and used for Hula Kāhiko. Participants will make a Pūniu.  Nā Ponohula participants will also learn an oli or hula using the Pūniu.
*Moderate activity


ULANA ʻIĒʻIĒ

Kumu Kumulaʻau Lloyd Sing
The `ie`ie is a very important plant in hula and Hawaiian culture.  When found growing in the native forests of Hawai`i, its presence is an indication that the forest is established and in good health.  It also has a place of honor on the kuahu or hula altar.  Student participants will have a rare opportunity to engage in this comprehensive learning journey which will also include instruction on proper gather practices and preparations.  Haumana will learn how to weave a hina`i (basket) with a cover. Nā Ponohula participants will also learn an oli using their creation
*Moderate activity


ʻULĪʻULĪ

Kumu Kamuela Chun
Participants will learn to make two different styles of ʻUlīʻulī or hula rattles; one with a poʻo hulu and one with lauhala handle and no poʻo. Nā Ponohula participants will learn an oli or hula using the ʻUlīʻulī.
*Moderate activity


ADDITIONAL HUAKAʻI OPPORTUNITIES WILL BE ADDED.

EASY – Activities require  little or no walking and very little hands on work.

MODERATE – Activities include easy hiking/walking and a medium level of hands on work.

STRENUOUS – Activities include hiking and heavy hands on work. Need to be physically fit.